WELCOME

The 86th annual meeting will be held at the University of Evansville, IN, USA, on October 9, 2015. The Indiana Academy of the Social Sciences invites papers in all areas of the social sciences for the 86th annual meeting at the University of Evansville on October 9th 2015.


Proposals for research paper presentations may be emailed to Dr. Young KIM at iasschair@evansville.edu or submitted electronically [click here] by July 31, 2015.

Papers may be submitted for publication in the peer-reviewed Journal of the Indiana Academy of the Social Sciences (JIASS). The Journal accepts paper submissions on an ongoing basis.

Undergraduate students are encouraged to participate in Undergraduate Poster Sessions. Poster sessions are an opportunity for undergraduates engaged in research in the social sciences to share their research with students and faculty.


We are excited to announce our keynote speaker, Professor Kosali Simon. Prof. Simon is a specialist in the economics of health insurance and policy in Indiana University, Bloomington.

Dr. Simon received her Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Maryland, and has conducted seminal research on the Affordable Care Act. She is a research associate of National Bureau of Economic Research and in 2013 was  selected to the National Advisory Committee of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Scholars Program. She is health co-editor for the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management and associate editor of Health Economics and an editorial board member for the American Journal of Health Economics.

The title of her talk is “Comparing Early Evidence to Predictions: The Affordable Care Act in 2015”. The following is her desciption of the upcoming talk:

In the years since the enactment of the Affordable Care Act and its full implementation in 2014, many analysts and politicians drew predictions about the impact the Act would have on coverage rates, health care delivery, and the labor market. In this talk, I review the social-science based predictions made before the law, and discuss the early evidence emerging on the impact of health reform. I also discuss areas in which social science research will continue to be needed to understand the ways in which the Affordable Care Act is affecting medicine and society.